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Author Archive

PostHeaderIcon Ways Joe Cross Started A Global Movement and you can too

The global activity that Joe has created now see’s his website (rebootwithjoe.com) getting over 600K of unique views per month, 700K of Facebook followers, 150K of Twitter followers and 50K of Instagram followers. This interview taught me so much about success, and Joe is a real down to earth, genuine guy but also an amazing serial entrepreneur at the same time who has had some hits and some misses.

Before he got into the juicing, in 2008 he sold his very successful company BrokerOne, which was the largest futures brokerage firm in Australia at the time. Not only has Joe built his own businesses but he has also helped other entrepreneurs in the fashion industry like Kit Willow and Thakoon Panichgul (made famous my Michelle Obama) with creating success and wealth.

  1. You must portray yourself in the right way

To build a global movement, you must be true, honest and transparent to your audience. You can’t think about your movement as a crowd you have to think about them as individuals.

When Joe makes a movie or writes a book, he thinks about the person sitting in their living room in Indiana watching his documentary or the person in London sitting in a park reading his blog.

 

  1. Tell great compelling stories

Joe believes that the world is quite binary. You’re either awake or asleep, alive or dead, male or female, healthy or unhealthy, broken or not broken. Only you know if you are broken and some people drift in and out of being broken, some people are never broken while others are just broken all the time.

When it comes to story telling Joe has the same binary view that you can either tell a story or you can’t. You either have the gift, or you don’t. Running fast is a good example; some people can run fast while others like Joe are slow and no matter how hard he trains, he will never be fast.

  1. Work out the best medium for your movement

Joe doesn’t believe that there is necessarily a best medium to build a global movement; he says it’s more about what your message or story is as to which medium will work best. For Joe, he found that documentaries were the best way to show the journey he had been on, and he honestly believes that documentary making chose him.

Joe describes the medium of documentaries as documenting reality, which was exactly what he was doing with his story. At the time Joe was making his documentary, the amount of people that knew him and the subject of juicing was not enough to do a television series, so a one-off documentary made the most sense.

  1. Monetise to keep building the movement

Knowing why you want to build a global movement is really important. In Joe’s case, he didn’t start his website RebootWithJoe.com for money but what he eventually realized is that to keep it going he needs to generate money from it.

There is nothing wrong with trying to monetise your global movement as long as you are open and transparent about the way in which you go about it. Monetising an audience is relatively new to the average entrepreneur or startup but for the old giants in radio and television, it’s been around for years.

 

  1. Leverage social and listen to Joe’s tips

To get on Netflix you have to have made good content in the first place, there’s no real magic secret to that. Once you go viral on Netflix, and you are going into millions of people’s homes, it’s not difficult to see your social media following explode.

There are Instagramers that have millions of followers because they’re good looking and wear tight pants, but you can’t measure that audience to one that generates and is a business income like Joe’s. The reason for this is because the followers of those Instagramers are often very young and don’t spend any money.

There are times when Joe could post an incredible photo of himself doing something amazing in the world that very few people could ever get to do, but he’s reluctant to post photos like that. The reason behind this is because there is no benefit of showing a photo of yourself in a private jet somewhere.

 

  1. Partner with someone who’s part of the story

When either party is benefiting a lot more than the other, partnerships don’t work. In the case of partnering with a juicer company like Breville, Joe chose them because they were part of his story and were used in the movie, so it kept the story real.

He also liked them because he’s Australian, and they are an Australian company. To sum up, the partnership simply aligns with Joe’s beliefs and message– simple.

“Partnerships work when both sides have a good deal”.

Getting the attention of a potential partner is quite straightforward these days. If there is a partner that aligns with your movement and you want to get them on board, do what Joe did, start to post photos of their product or service on your social media.

For Joe, the process of doing this led to Breville asking him to show a pre-screen and come of his documentary to their staff, and then when they were able to see an increase in sales for a few.

 

  1. Expand your movement through public speaking.

A great way to build your global movement is to do some public speaking. Public speaking can have a major impact on delivering your message, but it’s also the thing that people fear most. Try and implement the below points that Joe recommends and you should be fine.

— To start out, it’s best to talk with no microphone because this can sometimes be off putting if it’s your first time speaking public. When you speak in front of larger crowds, and you get a reverberation back from needing to use a microphone, you just have to mentally get and try over that, and it can take time. Most people are the same when you’re talking to a few thousand people you will still get nervous and that’s okay.

If you lose your train of thought,– Speaking without notes can pose a challenge. One tip that Joe learned when this happens is to be honest with the crowd and tell them you have lost your train of thought. Say something like “I have actually forgotten the next thing I was going to say,” this will give you time to recover rather than trying to think in silence in front of an audience.

Joe believes that the world is quite binary. When it comes to story telling Joe has the same binary view that you can either tell a story or you can’t. Running fast is a good example; some people can run fast while others like Joe are slow and no matter how hard he trains, he will never be fast.

Try and implement the below points that Joe recommends and you should be fine. You can also ask a business coach help in improving your business.

One tip that Joe learned when this happens is to be honest with the crowd and tell them you have lost your train of thought.

PostHeaderIcon Does Your Introduction Ready?

When Brad Newman introduced himself as an actrepreneur, I was hooked. Everything about his title told me he had information I wanted to hear. Over a few additional seconds, I learned that this actor and entrepreneur is the founder of Zentainment, “a socially conscious media company committed to growing brands that encourage you to dream big and live a sustainable life.” From there, a longer conversation– and a business relationship– followed, all spurred by an attention-getting introduction that took just moments to deliver.

The elevator pitch rides into the speed-dating era

Today’s economic environment has turned job fairs, trade shows, networking events and even sidewalk sales into buyers’ markets where only those with quick, compelling pitches survive.

In the 1990s, high-tech entrepreneurs named these short spiels “elevator pitches” because they could be conveyed during an elevator ride. The tech bubble ballooned and burst (and ballooned again), but elevator pitches are here to stay. Everyone– whether seeking employment, sales or profitable business associations– needs one.

Is your introduction ready to roll?

“So, what do you do?”.

Those five words are on the minds of everyone you meet, whether in person or online. Brad Newman’s introduction helps provide a formula that can assist you in preparing your answer and attracting attention from those you aim to impress:.

  1. Describe yourself in five words or less. Use a distinctive title or phrase that makes people think, “This sounds interesting” or “This is what I’m looking for.” Consider the difference between “I’m a copywriter” and “I turn browsers into buyers.” Or, in Newman’s case, between “social media entrepreneur” and “actrepreneur.”.
  2. Explain what you do in one sentence. After introducing yourself, introduce your offerings. “Our name combines the words Zen and entertainment, which stakes out our media space,” Newman says. “We’re a media company that focuses on socially conscious content. That definition tells what Zentainment is and rules out what it isn’t.” Work on a similarly specific description for your business.
  3. Define your target audience. “Our market is comprised of 30- to 49-year-olds who care about socially conscious living,” Newman says. “By defining our market in that way, people immediately know whether our business is for them.” In other words, Zentainment isn’t trying to be all things to all people. It’s focused on a specific target audience, which is a key to success in today’s crowded business environment.
  4. Communicate your vision. “We’re committed to growing brands that encourage you to dream big and live a sustainable life, whether they’re our own brands or ones for which we serve and consult as producers,” Newman says. “Our vision is clear enough to keep us focused and broad enough to make us adaptive to the opportunities of a changing market and media world.” It’s also compelling enough to attract a growing contingent of Zentainment consumers and business clients. What does your business stand for? What attracts your customers and their loyalty? Your answers can serve as a magnet for growth.
  5. Practice, practice, practice. Create a script that conveys who you are, what you offer, your market, and the distinctive benefits you provide. Edit until you can introduce yourself and your business in less than a minute, which is how long most prospects will give you to win their interest.
  6. Shrink your introduction even further so you can tell your story in 20 words or less. That’s how much space you have in most marketing materials and online presentations, whether on your own site, on social media sites, or on sites that link to your home page. If you’re thinking, “Twenty words? You’ve got to be kidding,” scroll back to the start of this column. That’s exactly what Brad Newman used to get my interest.

 

From there, a longer conversation– and a business relationship– followed, all spurred by an attention-getting introduction that took just moments to deliver.

Everyone– whether seeking employment, sales or profitable business associations– needs one.

It’s focused on a specific target audience, which is a key to success in today’s crowded business environment.

It’s also compelling enough to attract a growing contingent of Zentainment consumers and business clients. Edit until you can introduce yourself and your business in less than a minute, which is how long most prospects will give you to win their interest.

PostHeaderIcon Secrets of the Big Retail Chains

Ever walked into a big chain store and walked out with way more than you had planned to purchase? Big retailers certainly seem to know how to design their stores and create tempting displays to keep us shopping. It is important to know colour theory so you will not make mistake in choosing the right motif for your store.

What’s their secret? Here are seven layout tips from experts who have worked with many major retailers.

  1. Make windows shine. Many small retailers don’t do window displays, letting customers simply look straight into the shop. That’s a mistake, says store design and display consultant Linda Cahan of Cahan & Co. in West Linn, Ore. “Just like your eyes are the windows of your soul, store windows are the eyes of the store,” she says. “Each window should tell a story.”.

To create an appealing display, use a single color theme to grab attention and communicate your store’s image. It’s also important to avoid clutter because in retailing, space equals luxury, Cahan says. They’ll look cheap if you cram items together in a window. Think of how Tiffany displays just a few items in the window, communicating that they are special.

  1. Make an arresting first impression. When customers enter your store, an eye-catching display up front should make them slow down. Otherwise, they may hurry on through the store and buy little. Notice how Costco sets up large seasonal displays at its entrances, often with a product pulled out of its box– a kitchen appliance or fresh plants– that shoppers can stop to touch, smell or try.

Related: 5 Ways to Make Sweet Music for Your Business.

One problem in many small stores is a high rack up front that blocks views of the rest of the shop. They might leave if customers don’t like what they see on that first set of shelves. Instead, use lower shelving units with shorter pegs and narrower shelves. This makes the store look full without having to stock too much merchandise, as well as allows customers to see farther into the shop, says Pat Johnson, co-owner of the Seattle-based consulting firm Outcalt & Johnson: Retail Strategists.

  1. Steer customers to the. Retailers should design their stores to draw shoppers to the right side of the entryway. Studies have shown that most people naturally look first left, then right as they enter a store, says Brian Dyches, chief experience officer of retail branding firm Ikonic Tonic in Los Angeles. Shoppers usually then prefer to move right and walk counter-clockwise around the store.

For instance, enter a Safeway grocery store in the chain’s upscale Marketplace format, and your eye is drawn to the floral department on the right. The floral scents and bright colors remind shoppers of happy times in their lives, Dyches says, both putting them in a good mood and encouraging them to move right and begin walking the store counter-clockwise.

At 136-year-old Hermann Furniture in Brenham, Texas, visitors enter a foyer dominated by a round table of seasonal merchandise. Shoppers must pause at the table and decide how to navigate around it. A wider aisle on the right encourages them to move around the table in that direction.

  1. Lead them somewhere. Often, small retailers fail to put a compelling display at the end of an aisle, says store designer Cahan. “They create an aisle that ends at nothing, either a back wall or a stockroom or the bathroom.”.

Instead, Dyches says, retailers might use a long aisle to lead customers to a new department laid out perpendicular to other racks.

  1. Have an angle. While it’s most efficient to lay out aisles parallel to the store’s exterior walls, retailers can create more visual interest by placing them at an angle, Cahan says. Ideally, aisles could angle in from both sides to a central aisle, forming an arrow layout that ends in a back-wall display. Only take an angular approach if you can keep aisles wide enough for customers to navigate easily.
  2. Create breaks. In studying shopping patterns with his clients, Dyches says he finds that up to 20 percent of the store’s merchandise is skipped over. That’s because long, uninterrupted aisles don’t get people’s attention.

Related: 5 Tips for Boomer-Friendly Retail Design.

Take a page from Wal-Mart and other big-box retailers: Create stopping points in the middle of long aisles, such as signs or displays that create a visual break. Dyches likes how clothing chain Anthropologie often repeats a design behind wall displays and then changes or ends the pattern to try to get customers to stop at a special display.

  1. Offer ‘hugs.’ People are attracted to round and U-shapes, Dyches says. To get shoppers to stop at a display, try hanging a circular sign from the ceiling or placing a U-shaped background, such as a low wall with small sides extending forward, behind it. These make people want to stop and enter the space, which resembles a person extending their arms for a hug. Nordstrom makes great use of this technique in apparel displays, putting U-shaped partial walls behind mannequins on some displays, Dyches says.

Low-Cost Ways to Improve Your Layout.

On a tight budget? Consider these tips to begin improving your layout.

– Ask key employees and your best customers to walk through the store and offer feedback, says Dick Outcalt, co-owner of Outcalt & Johnson, which offers a questionnaire designed to help pinpoint trouble spots. Another approach is to take photos of your store, then gather staff for an analysis.

 

– Look for affordable help to make the changes you decide on if store design and merchandising aren’t your forte. You might share the services and costs of a design professional with several nearby retailers, for instance, or hire a college student from a merchandising or marketing program who might work for minimum wage or just course credit, says Cahan.

 

– To make low-cost displays, collect cheap decorative items that can be repainted and reused to fit different themes and seasons. Such items include empty picture frames, old watering cans and wooden chairs that can serve as shelving. All of those can be picked up at yard sales or from closeout bins at craft stores, Cahan says.

 

– Don’t consider it a finished job once you’ve made your changes. You need to change displays regularly to give customers a fresh experience every time they shop. “There’s never an area where we don’t change things nearly every day,” says Jennifer Hermann, owner of Hermann Furniture. “That’s fun, and makes customers want to buy.”.

 

Big retailers certainly seem to know how to design their stores and create tempting displays to keep us shopping. That’s a mistake, says store design and display consultant Linda Cahan of Cahan & Co. in West Linn, Ore. “Just like your eyes are the windows of your soul, store windows are the eyes of the store,” she says. To create an appealing display, use a single color theme to grab attention and communicate your store’s image. When customers enter your store, an eye-catching display up front should make them slow down. Often, small retailers fail to put a compelling display at the end of an aisle, says store designer Cahan.

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