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Business - PATENTLYOBVIOUSBLOG.com

Archive for the ‘Business’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Ways to Choose an Accountant Who is also a consultant

Don’t assume only big companies need the services of an accountant.

Accountants accountants in springwood help you keep an eye on major costs as early as the startup stage, a time when you’re probably preoccupied with counting every paper clip and postage stamp. Accountants help you look at the big picture.

In fact, perhaps no other business relationship has such potential to pay off. Nowadays, accountants are more than just bean counters. A good accountant can be your company’s financial partner for life– with intimate knowledge of everything from how you’re going to finance your next forklift to how you’re going to finance your daughter’s college education.

A general accounting practice covers four basic areas of expertise:

  1. Business advisory services
  2. Accounting and record-keeping
  3. Tax advice
  4. Auditing.

These four disciplines often overlap. If your accountant is helping you prepare the financial statements you need for a loan, and he or she gives you some insights into how certain estimates could be recalculated to get a more favorable review, the accountant is crossing the line from auditing into business advisory services.

The best way to find a good accountant is to get a referral from your attorney, your banker or a business colleague in the same industry. Don’t underestimate the importance of a CPA (certified public accountant). This title is only awarded to people who have passed a rigorous two-day, nationally standardized test.

The first step in setting the stage for a successful search is to take an inventory of what you will need. Given the level of fees you are prepared to pay, you must decide where your responsibility stops and where the accountant’s begins.

You’re ready to interview your referrals once you have compiled your documentation and given some thought to your expectations. Five candidates is a good number to start with. For each candidate, plan on two meetings before making your decision. One of these meetings should be at your site; one should be at theirs. Both parties need to know the environment the other works in.

Related: 10 Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Small-Business Attorney.

During the ensuing interviews, your principal goal is to find out about three things:.

Services.

Most accounting firms offer tax and auditing services. What about bookkeeping? Management consulting? Estate planning? Will the accountant help you design and implement financial information systems? Other services a CPA may offer include analyzing transactions for loans and financing; preparing, auditing, reviewing and compiling financial statements; managing investments; and representing you before tax authorities.

Smaller accounting firms are generally a better bet for entrepreneurs, they may not offer all these services. Make sure the firm has what you need. In addition to services, make sure the firm has experience with small business and with your industry.

Personality.

Is the accountant’s style compatible with yours? Be sure the people you are meeting with are the same ones who will be handling your business. At many accounting firms, some partners handle sales and new business, then pass the actual account work on to others.

When evaluating competency and compatibility, ask candidates how they would handle situations relevant to you. For example: How would you handle an IRS office audit seeking verification of automobile expenses? Listen to the answers, and decide if that’s how you would like your affairs to be handled. Realize, too, that having an accountant who takes a different approach can be a good thing. Be sure that the accountant won’t pressure you into doing things you aren’t comfortable with. It’s your money, and you need to be able to sleep at night.

Fees.

Ask about fees upfront. Most accounting firms charge by the hour; fees can range from $100 to $275 per hour. There are some accountants who work on a monthly retainer. Figure out what services you are likely to need and which option will be more cost-effective for you. Get a range of quotes from different accountants.

Try to get an estimate of the total annual charges based on the services you have discussed. Don’t base your decision solely on cost, however; an accountant who charges more by the hour is likely to be more thus able and experienced to work faster than a novice who charges less. At the end of the interview, ask for references– particularly from clients in the same industry as you.

After you have made your choice, spell out the terms of the agreement in an “engagement letter” that details the returns and statements to be prepared and the fees to be charged. This ensures you and your accountant have the same expectations and helps prevent misunderstandings and hard feelings.

Make the most of the accounting relationship by doing your part. Don’t hand your accountant a shoebox full of receipts. The better you maintain your records, the less time your accountant has to spend– and the lower your fees will be.

It’s a good idea to meet with your accountant every month. Review financial statements and go over any problems so you know where your money is going. This is where your accountant should go beyond number-crunching to suggest alternative ways of cutting costs and act as a sounding board for any ideas or questions you have.

A good accountant can help your business in ways you never dreamed possible. Spending the time to find the right accountant– and taking advantage of the advice he or she has to offer– is one of the best things you can do to help your business soar.

 

A good accountant can be your company’s financial partner for life– with intimate knowledge of everything from how you’re going to finance your next forklift to how you’re going to finance your daughter’s college education.

The best way to find a good accountant is to get a referral from your attorney, your banker or a business colleague in the same industry. Will the accountant help you design and implement financial information systems? Realize, too, that having an accountant who takes a different approach can be a good thing. Don’t base your decision solely on cost, however; an accountant who charges more by the hour is likely to be more experienced and thus able to work faster than a novice who charges less.

PostHeaderIcon Why Starbucks Is So Successful?

Starbucks has not only revolutionized the way we think about coffee, but they have literally transformed the English language.

Starbucks has introduced terms like barista, chai, latte, venti, and Frappuccino into everyday vocabulary.

The “third place,” as many of us refer to it as, has had a global impact on the way coffee is purchased, sold, and ultimately consumed by millions of people each day. Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks has no plan of scaling back his efforts either.

Starbucks continues to open 5 stores daily, 365 days a year. With that type of continual rapid growth, there are many key insights that have attributed to this success. There have been many books written about this story, however I am a stickler for empirical evidence.

Joseph Michelli, author of the Starbucks Experience, spent countless hours, days, and months working alongside Starbucks senior management figuring out what the key success principles are that have allowed this company to have such rapid growth, while staying vigilantly consistent across the board. I have deduced what I believe to be the top 5 insights that we, as business managers and owners can use to help scale our businesses and create raving fans.

Before we dive in to the insights, I would like to set the stage by sharing with you a quote from Jim Alling, President of Starbucks U.S.

“Sure, one of our principles is to recognize that profitability is essential to our future success. It’s not the first item on the list; it’s the last one. And when you live and work according to those kinds of principles, good things seem to come your way.”.

 

Key Insight # 1: Create strategic alliances with your employees.

Starbucks links their partner’s efforts directly to the success of the whole business enterprise: if the partners win, Starbucks wins. This eliminates the normal zero-sum game and creates a win-win scenario because the more profitable Starbucks is, the more profitable the individual partner at the store level is as well. Not every company can reward employees in the same fashion or scale as Starbuck’s. What we can do is treat our teams with enough care and concern to inspire passion and creativity.

Many companies have shied away from talking with their employees about profit, however, Starbucks takes a completely different approach. “Starbucks leadership has done an exceptional job of both linking a partner’s financial gain to Starbuck’s profit and helping partners understand that profit is the lifeblood of a business.” Michelli.

Starbucks consistently spends more on training than it does on advertising which results in 120 % less turnover than the industry average.

“The way we have built our company by including the success of the company with everyone in it and not leaving our people behind is a great example of building a business the right way.”– Howard Schultz.

Key Insight # 2: Living the mission statement.

It was said best by Paul Williams: “The mission statement and the intentions– they’re not just on paper. They truly are meant to be the way things get done.”.

Leaders walk the walk, so they don’t have to talk the talk. The company is aligned on their vision across all levels of the business. This creates a culture of living the mission statement which in turn encourages the partners to offer the same vision to their customers.

Leading by example– Michelli noted a perfect quote for this point: “For any organization, it’s difficult, albeit not impossible, to soar with the eagles if you are led by a flock of turkeys.”.

 

Key Insight # 3: Starbucks 5 ways of being.

Every partner is coached on embodying the Starbucks 5 ways of being, which creates a delightful and consistently fresh experience for patrons.

– Be Welcoming– make it your own– leaders encourage partners to use their own unique style to produce inviting encounters. Different means to the same end goal– each person is different and should champion their own strengths to create a lasting relationship with the customer.

– Be genuine– Starbucks definition– “to connect, discover, and respond.” This requires listening followed by action. Do not get stuck in paralysis by analysis.

– Be considerate– consider the needs of others, how can you invest more of yourself and encourage your teammates to increase their investment to be more considerate?

– Be knowledgeable– Starbucks definition– “love what they do and share it with others.” In today’s information age, we add value to our efforts when we gain work related knowledge. Sharing knowledge with customers makes for more sophisticated consumers– AKA the “ideal customer.” They offer our business their loyalty and come to see us as trusted advisors rather than just transaction handlers when we add value/knowledge to our customers!

– Be involved– community, and in the store with customers.

Key Insight # 4: Everything matters.

This is referring to solid processes and procedures in daily operations– “retail is detail.” Starbucks puts an emphasis on consistency, even in the minute details. They take the mentality of nothing is trivial and our customers notice everything.

Starbucks focuses on finding ways to deliver existing products and services in ways that make the brand more significant to the customer– more than just a transaction, they focus on the whole buying experience. Starbucks focuses on creating a “felt sense” about the business.

Dr. Eugene Gendlin defined this term as the result of a myriad of tiny details that lurk below our conscious awareness. How can we make our customers “felt sense” align with our businesses brand/vision? Focus on all the details.

“The Starbucks sensation is driven not just by the quality of its products but by the entire atmosphere surrounding the purchase of coffee.”– Corporate Design Foundation.

 

Key Insight # 5: Embrace resistance.

This requires leaders to distinguish between customers who want their concerns to be resolved and those who will never stop complaining or be satisfied.

When faced with customer complaints, there is an opportunity to actually turn that perceived negative into a head over heels positive. You gain a rare perspective into the customers mind. This is an opportunity to learn more about what you can do, how to become better, how to approach processes differently, and ultimately become closer to creating a great experience for the customer.

Just listening is not enough, you must take action which shows the customers that their voices are heard and that leadership cares, thus creating brand loyalty.

Starbucks example– when entering new markets, in some cases Starbucks receives a lot of resistance. The way they have combated this is to keep their core products and services the same, but tailored other aspects such as food offerings to the local cuisines. This creates a sense of caring, and turns many “haters” into long lasting patrons.

“Embracing resistance involves a complex set of skills that can enable business and individuals to create business and relationship opportunities when they are confronted with skepticism, wariness, or irritation.”– Michelli.

It is important to remember that these insights were not implemented over night, it has taken Starbucks many years to find the right ingredients for the perfect cup of coffee.

My advice to us as business leaders and owners is to understand these insights at a granular level, and start to implement them one at a time in our respective businesses. In the next strategic planning meeting, brainstorm on how these insights relate to your industry, and create an implementation plan. Remember; it is all about the customer. You can ask a good business coach to give you some advice on where to focus and how to implement them.

 

Starbucks continues to open 5 stores daily, 365 days a year. Before we dive in to the insights, I would like to set the stage by sharing with you a quote from Jim Alling, President of Starbucks U.S.

“Sure, one of our principles is to recognize that profitability is essential to our future success. Starbucks links their partner’s efforts directly to the success of the whole business enterprise: if the partners win, Starbucks wins. Many companies have shied away from talking with their employees about profit, however, Starbucks takes a completely different approach. Starbucks example– when entering new markets, in some cases Starbucks receives a lot of

PostHeaderIcon How To Choose The Best Idea For Your Next Business

An usual request I hear from aspiring entrepreneurs is for an assessment of their latest idea. I don’t even try to assess things at the idea level, since I can’t read minds. I can assess execution plans, if you have any. I believe that business success is more a function of the person than the idea or the plan, so the best idea is one that is a best fit for you, and only you can assess that.

The best new idea for any entrepreneur should first be based on their own personal interests, skills, and lifestyle, rather than the characteristics of a given market or technology. I found some great insights along these lines in the just released book “Find Your Balance Point,” by renowned executive business coach Brian Tracy, and work-life balance therapist Christina Stein.

They emphasize, and I agree, that true success and satisfaction is most likely to happen when all your actions and choices are guided by a profound adherence to your deepest personal values, vision, purpose, and goals. Here are seven key considerations for how you should make your own best entrepreneur business idea decision in this context:

  1. Pick something you really enjoy doing. If your passion is social change or sustainability, with financial value creation further down in priority, you should choose to be a social entrepreneur. Don’t pick a technology idea that someone else believes will make you famous and rich, or a business area you are not intimately familiar with.
  2. The idea or technology was easy for you to learn. If you feel an idea was born inside you without thought or effort, or you learned the details easily, it’s a great idea for you. The next step is to do homework on the business issues that are common to all ideas, such as market size, business models, and marketing. Then ask me about execution.
  3. You look forward to learning and contributing more. Every new idea is only the beginning of a long journey, and the actions you take along the way will determine your ultimate success and satisfaction. You need to enjoy the learning along the way, as well as the destination. If all you see ahead is stress and pain, look for another idea.
  4. When engrossed with this idea, the hours fly by. The best and most successful entrepreneurs, such as Elon Musk, known for PayPal, SpaceX, and Tesla Motors, routinely work hundred-hour weeks, but never complain about the hours, and don’t even think of their activities as work. He doesn’t ask or need anyone to assess his ideas.
  5. Working on this idea gives you renewed energy. Everyone develops a sense of what activities build their energy, and which ones drain energy from them. As an introvert, I lose energy quickly working a room full of people, while my extrovert friends come away from a social gathering more fully energized. Find ideas that energize you.
  6. You continually strive to communicate the value and sell. Smart entrepreneurs develop quick elevator pitches for their ideas, good product and business stories, and are eager for the opportunity to learn and communicate from feedback. As an investor, I’m not attracted to startups where the founder sends in a marketing person to do the talking.
  7. You love to associate with the top people in the business area. The best ideas are ones that get attention from experts and key constituents in relevant business areas. Part of the satisfaction of being an entrepreneur is being able to interact with and learn from the people you respect most. Test your ideas on them, and listen to the answers.

Finding the balance point in your life’s work is not an easy task, but it is critical to long-term success and happiness. Establishing the right professional identity and commensurate business is equal in importance to maintaining your health and finding the right personal relationships and family life. You can never satisfy everyone, so you need to start by satisfying yourself.

Before you poll the world on what they think of your next great idea, be sure you assess your own drivers along the lines listed here. Build a plan to make it a business if everything fits. If you can’t build a plan, or your investors and advisors find it unconvincing, it’s time to give that idea to someone else and try a new one. I see more than enough great ideas to match any entrepreneur.

 

I believe that business success is more a function of the person than the plan or the idea, so the best idea is one that is a best fit for you, and only you can assess that.

If you feel an idea was born inside you without thought or effort, or you learned the details easily, it’s a great idea for you. The next step is to do homework on the business issues that are common to all ideas, such as market size, business models, and marketing. Smart entrepreneurs develop quick elevator pitches for their ideas, good product and business stories, and are eager for the opportunity to learn and communicate from feedback. The best ideas are ones that get attention from experts and key constituents in relevant business areas.

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